Category Archives: Cats

Jealousy: Dealing with a Jealous Pet

jealousy, jealous pet, dog

Just like you, your pet will experience different emotions on different days. After a long walk to the park, your dog might feel exhausted and happy. If you scolded your dog for being disobedient, it might tuck its tail under and sulk in the corner. One emotion that animals can experience is jealousy. Jealousy can be directed toward a new pet in the house or a new family member, such as a newborn infant.

While jealousy is normal in most circumstances, pet parents should know how to address this issue before it becomes a larger problem.

Tips for Dealing with a Jealous Pet

If you are introducing a new family member into the home, furry or otherwise, follow the below steps to help ease potential jealousy.

Equal Affection

If you’ve recently brought a new pet into the home, be sure to split up your time evenly between pets. Although it’s tempting to focus on your new family member, your established pet needs equal time.

If you spend 30 minutes training a new puppy, be sure to spend 30 minutes playing exclusively with your cat. Likewise, if you reward your new puppy with a tasty treat, like a NuVet Plus wafer, make sure you treat your other pet as well.

When your cat knows that you will still spend time with them, their feelings of jealousy will likely subside quicker.

Boundaries

Establish boundaries for the new addition in your home. For instance, if you have brought home a new puppy and your first dog is feeling jealous, be sure to keep their toys separate.

Do not allow the new puppy to gnaw on the first dog’s toys. The same goes for when a new baby arrives — be sure that the dog and the baby have their own play things, and try to establish proper social boundaries.

Stick to Routine

Try to avoid disrupting your original pet’s routine. Pets can become quite accustomed to their routine, and it helps them to feel safe and secure.

If you bring home a new pet or baby, try to make sure that your first pet stays on the same schedule. Abiding by the same schedule will help your original pet maintain a sense of normalcy. The less change to your first pet’s everyday life, the less it will feel like its life has been disrupted.

Quality Time

Be sure to spend some alone time each day with your original pet. In many cases, a jealous pet simply wants more attention from its owner. By giving your first pet special time with just you, it won’t be as apt to jealousy of another pet or baby in the house.

Take your dog for a walk, or spend time scratching your cat’s belly. Make it a priority to fit in a few minutes of uninterrupted time with your pet each day.

A Healthy Pet

Of course, it’s important to keep your pet’s mind, body and spirit healthy at all times. The best way to do this is to add a pet nutritional supplement, such as NuVet Plus, to their diet.

This specialized formula is created with the highest-quality ingredients, and will ensure that all your pet’s nutritional needs are met. To find out more about the benefits of NuVet Plus and NuJoint Plus, follow NuVet Labs on Facebook today.

House Training: Stop Accidents Before They Happen

House training your puppy is a necessity. No one wants a pet who eliminates wherever they want. Although dogs can be potty trained at any age, the earlier it’s done, the sooner you’ll see success.

The one exception to this is puppies under 12 weeks of age. This is because they have little to no control over their bladders. You can begin training with your puppy before he’s 12 weeks, but anticipate more accidents during this time.

Formulate Your House Training Plan

Preparation begins even before your puppy comes home. Create a plan based on your lifestyle and living situation, then purchase the supplies you need.

Unless someone will be home with the puppy all day, you’ll need to keep him in a safe, designated area. You can use a crate, a room with a closed door, or section off an area with a baby gate.

If you’re using a room of the house, be sure it has bare floors rather than carpeting or rugs so accidents don’t get soaked up while you’re away. Remove any items the puppy could chew on or get caught up in, including window blind cords and electrical wires. Puppy pads are recommended in this situation.

Using a Crate

If you’re going to crate train your puppy, decide what size crate you want to purchase. Do you want to purchase a crate that fits him now, or one he will grow into? A non-house trained puppy should have just enough room inside the crate to stand up, turn around and lie down.

The rule of thumb is to get a crate one-and-a-half times the length of the dog from his nose to the start of his tail. However, if you know your puppy will be much larger when full-grown, you can begin with a crate big enough for his adult size as long as you can attach partitions that will limit his access to the appropriate amount of space.

Leave the bottom of the crate bare. Puppies normally will not lie in their own urine. Therefore, limit the space in the crate to the room he needs to sleep, with nothing absorbent to pee on.

No matter the method you choose for house training, the most important and abundant supply you’ll need is patience.

Getting Started

Several rules of thumb will help you through the house training process.

  • Until your puppy has shown he understands the concept of eliminating in a designated area, keep him with you on a leash whenever he’s in the house. This allows you to quickly escort him outside if he looks like he’s about to go to the bathroom.
  • Puppies generally can hold their bladders for as many hours as they are months old plus one. For instance, a 4-month old puppy will likely be able to hold his urine for 5 hours. Therefore, if you leave your puppy alone for longer than that, expect to come home to an accident.
  • Never punish your puppy for an accident. It will only serve to create fear in him whenever he has to eliminate. If you catch him in the act, make a quick, sharp noise to get his attention, but not scare him, then quickly take him outside or to the puppy pad to finish. Praise him with words and petting when he finishes properly.
  • If he has an accident outside of your view, do not react when you find it. He won’t understand that you’re yelling or punishing him for something he did minutes before. Simply put the dog in another room and use an odor-eliminating cleaner on the spot.

Setting a Routine

Dogs respond well to structure. Create a routine for house training. No matter your schedule, try to stick as closely to the routine as possible every day.

1.Morning Elimination

Begin each morning with a trip outside on the leash. Give your puppy 5 minutes to eliminate. Immediately upon finishing – not before so you don’t startle him – praise him for it. Remain outside for another 10 minutes to ensure he empties his bladder and bowels completely.

Puppies don’t always totally eliminate in one squatting. If you bring him inside immediately after going, he will learn to hold it just to get more time outside.

If your puppy doesn’t go in the first 5 minutes, bring him back inside. Once inside, confine him in his crate, a small penned-in area or tether him to you with constant supervision. Continue to take him outside on leash every 15 to 30 minutes until you get a successful elimination, as described above.

2.Supervised Free Time

After the extra 10 minutes, come back inside and give the puppy supervised “free time” for 10 to 30 minutes.

When the puppy has developed manners in the house – not chewing on items or jumping on furniture – you can drop the leash to the floor and allow the dog to follow you around. Grabbing the leash if the puppy acts up or tries to wander off still gives you control over his actions.

3.Before and After Breakfast

Take him out again to go potty before you feed him breakfast. If he doesn’t go in the first 5 minutes, feed him in his crate or confined area to keep an eye on him.

Don’t give him more than 10 to 20 minutes to eat and drink, then take him outside immediately after he’s done. The additional 10 minutes is especially important after eating, even though he’ll likely relieve himself very quickly after a meal.

4.Getting Ready for Your Day

Bring him back inside as you get ready for your day, keeping him tethered to a heavy object in your view. Take him outside again after this resting period.

If you don’t get a successful elimination, bring him back in and confine him while you finish getting ready. Try one more trip outside before beginning your day.

Going to Work

If you work outside of the home and the puppy will be left alone for an extended time, be sure to take him outside to eliminate and exercise him just before you leave. Then put him in his crate or confined area with a small amount of water and a toy or two for entertainment.

If you will be home with him all day, continue the routine of taking him out after resting, eating or drinking water.

If someone won’t be home within the maximum time your puppy can hold his bladder, leave puppy pads in his area. Ideally, he’ll have an enclosed area near the door you take him through when eliminating outside. Leave his crate open inside the area and puppy pads placed as close to the exit door as possible.

Returning Home

When you return home, immediately take your puppy outside to eliminate, and then play with him for half-an-hour in the yard. Leash him to encourage elimination before returning inside.

Give him 30 minutes of supervised free time as you change or prepare dinner.
After he eats, take him outside immediately and follow the same routine as breakfast.

The rest of the evening should feature a walk, play time, obedience training and multiple trips outside to eliminate. Pull your dog’s water bowl at least 2 hours prior to bed time and take him out immediately before putting him in his crate or pen for the night.

Although your puppy may hold his bladder until morning, be prepared for middle-of-the-night potty breaks when he’s young. If he normally begins to whine around 3 a.m. and has to eliminate, set an alarm for 2:30 a.m. and take him out before the whining starts. This will discourage a tendency to cry simply to be let out of the crate or pen.

Advanced Behaviors

When your puppy has consistently eliminated successfully for several days or a week, you can begin to give him the “go potty” cue when you see him squat, circle or sniff the ground, indicating his need to go.

He will eventually learn this cue like “sit” and “stay,” allowing you to instruct him to eliminate when and where you want. Your puppy may eventually learn to go to the door you take him out of when he needs to eliminate, but you can easily reinforce or train this behavior.

Attach a small bell to or near the door and use the puppy’s paw to ring it before you take him out each time. Or simply use his paw to tap the door once or twice. He will learn that this behavior results in him being let outside.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • While puppies usually need to eliminate almost immediately after eating, drinking or resting, even adult dogs tend to have to go within 15 to 30 minutes after these activities.
  • During the house training process, always praise your puppy after a successful elimination. It reinforces the behavior you want.
  • Always accompany your leashed puppy during house training to be sure he goes to the bathroom. Don’t assume he eliminated because you let him go outside.
  • If you don’t have a yard to take your puppy into, substitute puppy pads for some of the trips outdoors, using the same timing and routines.
  • If your puppy consistently has accidents despite a training routine, take him to the veterinarian to see if there can be something else contributing to your puppies accidents.

Why Exercise Is Important For Your Pet

pets, exercise

Just like your human family members, your new pet needs plenty of exercise in order to live a healthy, happy life. However, it’s important to recognize your new addition’s limits. Then, you can develop an exercise routine that is appropriate for your puppy or kitten’s size, breed and temperament.

Your veterinarian can help you create an exercise routine that is beneficial for everyone in your home. Proper exercise can help diminish destructive behavior, avoid hyperactivity, develop good social skills, improve sleeping habits and allow your pet to maintain a healthy weight.

Beginning to Exercise

There are a few key things you must consider before beginning an exercise routine with your new puppy or kitten. For starters, you must make sure that both you and your pet are in good shape to exercise. You may want to consider a slight warm-up routine before you start with the rigorous exercise program.

For instance, start your puppy off by letting it run in circles a few times before taking a short walk. When you are done exercising, you will want to let your pet stretch a bit in order to prevent injury. Hold out a treat in front of your animal in order to make them take a bow and stretch their muscles.

Note that you can exercise your dog or kitten both indoors and outdoors. It is just important to choose a spot that is safe and comfortable for you and your pet. You don’t need a lot of supplies in order to work out with your pet — simply invest in a leash if you are taking your dog outdoors or buy a few toys that might stimulate some activity.

Exercise Tips for Puppies

  • Talk to your veterinarian about types of exercise that would be beneficial for your new pet. For example, a pug has a short and flat nose and might have a difficult time breathing on an extended walk or during vigorous exercise. Likewise, young puppies should not go on walks that are too long, as their bones are still growing and developing.
  • Include brain exercise routines to help develop your new puppy’s mental skills. Puzzle toys are perfect for helping your dog learn how to find treats and explore appropriate spaces. For example, a Kong is a common puzzle toy. This toy allows you as the pet owner to store a treat in the Kong toy. Your dog will have to think about how it will retrieve the snack. It not only keeps your dog occupied, but also provides your pet with mental stimulation.
  • Disguise exercise with fun play activities. A daily dose of playing will help you bond with your puppy, as well as get them to use up some of their excess energy. Fetch is always a great choice, and also teaches your dog a few things about obedience along the way.

Exercise Tips for Kittens

  • Kittens will get most of their exercise through play activities, and you should make it a point to play with your cat at different intervals throughout the day. At a minimum, cats should receive about 10-15 minutes of one-on-one play time with you.
  • Consider purchasing a scratch post or climbing tree for your new kitten. These toys encourage them to stretch their new muscles and develop good habits. A scratch post gives them an appropriate place to use their claws. It also helps file down the sharp points on their claws.
  • Be your kitten’s play mate. Remember, your cat’s no longer with its siblings, which help to teach it a lot of its social skills. Let your kitten romp with you, and gently let your new pet know when it is playing too rough.

In addition to developing a well-rounded exercise routine for your pet, you also need to make sure all of their nutritional needs are being met. Choosing a healthy pet food with plenty of protein is a good start, but don’t forget to include pet nutrition supplements such as the one’s offered by NuVet Labs. The NuVet puppy and kitten supplements are designed to enhance your pet’s diet to ensure it is getting all of the essential vitamins and minerals, allowing it to have the best start in life.

Top 5 Things To Do Before You Bring Your New Kitty Home

New Kitty, Bring Your New Kitty Home

A kitten is a great addition to your family. Those soft lovely furs and expressive eyes are absolutely irresistible! A new kitty parent is excited and anxious to bring their new furry family member home.

However, you have to prepare some important things before you bring a new kitten home. Here’s a list of the top 5 things to do to get everything ready.

Make Sure the House is Safe for Kitty

Before you bring your kitten home, make sure that the entire house is safe for your new pet. Secure all harmful chemicals in a cupboard and keep all medicines in a safe place that is out of your new family member’s reach. Also make sure that all screens and windows are secure. Put away all sharp and shiny objects that may be harmful to your pet when ingested. Lastly, get rid of any holes or openings where your kitten can get stuck in.

Prepare Everybody for Kitty’s Arrival

Not everyone will be happy having a kitten around. However, you can do something about it by helping them understand the joy and benefits of having a little furry pet at home. Kids will surely be happy but let them know that like humans, kittens will grow up too. Likewise, find out if any existing family member has any sensitivities towards cats before bringing them home.

Take your Kitten to a Veterinarian

Before you take her home, take your kitten to a veterinarian. It is very important that your new feline family member receives the essential tests and vaccinations before being exposed to a new environment. Make sure that your new cat is in perfect condition before you welcome her home.

Prepare All Things your Kitten Will Need

There are lots of things that your kitten will need once you bring her home. For example, stock your kitchen with the appropriate cat foods and treats. Prepare other essentials like a food dish, water dish, scooper, cat litter, kitty tower, cat toys and grooming essentials.

Prepare your cat’s vitamins and supplements too. NuVet Plus is a natural, high-quality nutritional supplement that can help your cat become healthier and more enthusiastic. The NuVet Plus feline formula can be sprinkled on your kitty’s food to fill the nutritional gaps.

Remember, your kitten is not born with a fully developed immune system. Nutrition is especially important while the immune system continues to develop. The NuVet Plus feline contains nutrients, like Whey Protein and Taurine, that are crucial for feline health.

Take Things Slow

There’s no point rushing things once your kitty arrives. Take things slowly and be patient with your kitten. Like anyone else, it will take time for your little cat to get comfortable in a new environment. Help her transition into her new home by avoiding rushing her or forcing her to do certain things. Remind your family members, especially the kids, to take good care of their new pet.

Read more interesting feline facts on https://blog.nuvet.com/.

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