Category Archives: nuvetplus

Jealousy: Dealing with a Jealous Pet

jealousy, jealous pet, dog

Just like you, your pet will experience different emotions on different days. After a long walk to the park, your dog might feel exhausted and happy. If you scolded your dog for being disobedient, it might tuck its tail under and sulk in the corner. One emotion that animals can experience is jealousy. Jealousy can be directed toward a new pet in the house or a new family member, such as a newborn infant.

While jealousy is normal in most circumstances, pet parents should know how to address this issue before it becomes a larger problem.

Tips for Dealing with a Jealous Pet

If you are introducing a new family member into the home, furry or otherwise, follow the below steps to help ease potential jealousy.

Equal Affection

If you’ve recently brought a new pet into the home, be sure to split up your time evenly between pets. Although it’s tempting to focus on your new family member, your established pet needs equal time.

If you spend 30 minutes training a new puppy, be sure to spend 30 minutes playing exclusively with your cat. Likewise, if you reward your new puppy with a tasty treat, like a NuVet Plus wafer, make sure you treat your other pet as well.

When your cat knows that you will still spend time with them, their feelings of jealousy will likely subside quicker.

Boundaries

Establish boundaries for the new addition in your home. For instance, if you have brought home a new puppy and your first dog is feeling jealous, be sure to keep their toys separate.

Do not allow the new puppy to gnaw on the first dog’s toys. The same goes for when a new baby arrives — be sure that the dog and the baby have their own play things, and try to establish proper social boundaries.

Stick to Routine

Try to avoid disrupting your original pet’s routine. Pets can become quite accustomed to their routine, and it helps them to feel safe and secure.

If you bring home a new pet or baby, try to make sure that your first pet stays on the same schedule. Abiding by the same schedule will help your original pet maintain a sense of normalcy. The less change to your first pet’s everyday life, the less it will feel like its life has been disrupted.

Quality Time

Be sure to spend some alone time each day with your original pet. In many cases, a jealous pet simply wants more attention from its owner. By giving your first pet special time with just you, it won’t be as apt to jealousy of another pet or baby in the house.

Take your dog for a walk, or spend time scratching your cat’s belly. Make it a priority to fit in a few minutes of uninterrupted time with your pet each day.

A Healthy Pet

Of course, it’s important to keep your pet’s mind, body and spirit healthy at all times. The best way to do this is to add a pet nutritional supplement, such as NuVet Plus, to their diet.

This specialized formula is created with the highest-quality ingredients, and will ensure that all your pet’s nutritional needs are met. To find out more about the benefits of NuVet Plus and NuJoint Plus, follow NuVet Labs on Facebook today.

House Training: Stop Accidents Before They Happen

House training your puppy is a necessity. No one wants a pet who eliminates wherever they want. Although dogs can be potty trained at any age, the earlier it’s done, the sooner you’ll see success.

The one exception to this is puppies under 12 weeks of age. This is because they have little to no control over their bladders. You can begin training with your puppy before he’s 12 weeks, but anticipate more accidents during this time.

Formulate Your House Training Plan

Preparation begins even before your puppy comes home. Create a plan based on your lifestyle and living situation, then purchase the supplies you need.

Unless someone will be home with the puppy all day, you’ll need to keep him in a safe, designated area. You can use a crate, a room with a closed door, or section off an area with a baby gate.

If you’re using a room of the house, be sure it has bare floors rather than carpeting or rugs so accidents don’t get soaked up while you’re away. Remove any items the puppy could chew on or get caught up in, including window blind cords and electrical wires. Puppy pads are recommended in this situation.

Using a Crate

If you’re going to crate train your puppy, decide what size crate you want to purchase. Do you want to purchase a crate that fits him now, or one he will grow into? A non-house trained puppy should have just enough room inside the crate to stand up, turn around and lie down.

The rule of thumb is to get a crate one-and-a-half times the length of the dog from his nose to the start of his tail. However, if you know your puppy will be much larger when full-grown, you can begin with a crate big enough for his adult size as long as you can attach partitions that will limit his access to the appropriate amount of space.

Leave the bottom of the crate bare. Puppies normally will not lie in their own urine. Therefore, limit the space in the crate to the room he needs to sleep, with nothing absorbent to pee on.

No matter the method you choose for house training, the most important and abundant supply you’ll need is patience.

Getting Started

Several rules of thumb will help you through the house training process.

  • Until your puppy has shown he understands the concept of eliminating in a designated area, keep him with you on a leash whenever he’s in the house. This allows you to quickly escort him outside if he looks like he’s about to go to the bathroom.
  • Puppies generally can hold their bladders for as many hours as they are months old plus one. For instance, a 4-month old puppy will likely be able to hold his urine for 5 hours. Therefore, if you leave your puppy alone for longer than that, expect to come home to an accident.
  • Never punish your puppy for an accident. It will only serve to create fear in him whenever he has to eliminate. If you catch him in the act, make a quick, sharp noise to get his attention, but not scare him, then quickly take him outside or to the puppy pad to finish. Praise him with words and petting when he finishes properly.
  • If he has an accident outside of your view, do not react when you find it. He won’t understand that you’re yelling or punishing him for something he did minutes before. Simply put the dog in another room and use an odor-eliminating cleaner on the spot.

Setting a Routine

Dogs respond well to structure. Create a routine for house training. No matter your schedule, try to stick as closely to the routine as possible every day.

1.Morning Elimination

Begin each morning with a trip outside on the leash. Give your puppy 5 minutes to eliminate. Immediately upon finishing – not before so you don’t startle him – praise him for it. Remain outside for another 10 minutes to ensure he empties his bladder and bowels completely.

Puppies don’t always totally eliminate in one squatting. If you bring him inside immediately after going, he will learn to hold it just to get more time outside.

If your puppy doesn’t go in the first 5 minutes, bring him back inside. Once inside, confine him in his crate, a small penned-in area or tether him to you with constant supervision. Continue to take him outside on leash every 15 to 30 minutes until you get a successful elimination, as described above.

2.Supervised Free Time

After the extra 10 minutes, come back inside and give the puppy supervised “free time” for 10 to 30 minutes.

When the puppy has developed manners in the house – not chewing on items or jumping on furniture – you can drop the leash to the floor and allow the dog to follow you around. Grabbing the leash if the puppy acts up or tries to wander off still gives you control over his actions.

3.Before and After Breakfast

Take him out again to go potty before you feed him breakfast. If he doesn’t go in the first 5 minutes, feed him in his crate or confined area to keep an eye on him.

Don’t give him more than 10 to 20 minutes to eat and drink, then take him outside immediately after he’s done. The additional 10 minutes is especially important after eating, even though he’ll likely relieve himself very quickly after a meal.

4.Getting Ready for Your Day

Bring him back inside as you get ready for your day, keeping him tethered to a heavy object in your view. Take him outside again after this resting period.

If you don’t get a successful elimination, bring him back in and confine him while you finish getting ready. Try one more trip outside before beginning your day.

Going to Work

If you work outside of the home and the puppy will be left alone for an extended time, be sure to take him outside to eliminate and exercise him just before you leave. Then put him in his crate or confined area with a small amount of water and a toy or two for entertainment.

If you will be home with him all day, continue the routine of taking him out after resting, eating or drinking water.

If someone won’t be home within the maximum time your puppy can hold his bladder, leave puppy pads in his area. Ideally, he’ll have an enclosed area near the door you take him through when eliminating outside. Leave his crate open inside the area and puppy pads placed as close to the exit door as possible.

Returning Home

When you return home, immediately take your puppy outside to eliminate, and then play with him for half-an-hour in the yard. Leash him to encourage elimination before returning inside.

Give him 30 minutes of supervised free time as you change or prepare dinner.
After he eats, take him outside immediately and follow the same routine as breakfast.

The rest of the evening should feature a walk, play time, obedience training and multiple trips outside to eliminate. Pull your dog’s water bowl at least 2 hours prior to bed time and take him out immediately before putting him in his crate or pen for the night.

Although your puppy may hold his bladder until morning, be prepared for middle-of-the-night potty breaks when he’s young. If he normally begins to whine around 3 a.m. and has to eliminate, set an alarm for 2:30 a.m. and take him out before the whining starts. This will discourage a tendency to cry simply to be let out of the crate or pen.

Advanced Behaviors

When your puppy has consistently eliminated successfully for several days or a week, you can begin to give him the “go potty” cue when you see him squat, circle or sniff the ground, indicating his need to go.

He will eventually learn this cue like “sit” and “stay,” allowing you to instruct him to eliminate when and where you want. Your puppy may eventually learn to go to the door you take him out of when he needs to eliminate, but you can easily reinforce or train this behavior.

Attach a small bell to or near the door and use the puppy’s paw to ring it before you take him out each time. Or simply use his paw to tap the door once or twice. He will learn that this behavior results in him being let outside.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • While puppies usually need to eliminate almost immediately after eating, drinking or resting, even adult dogs tend to have to go within 15 to 30 minutes after these activities.
  • During the house training process, always praise your puppy after a successful elimination. It reinforces the behavior you want.
  • Always accompany your leashed puppy during house training to be sure he goes to the bathroom. Don’t assume he eliminated because you let him go outside.
  • If you don’t have a yard to take your puppy into, substitute puppy pads for some of the trips outdoors, using the same timing and routines.
  • If your puppy consistently has accidents despite a training routine, take him to the veterinarian to see if there can be something else contributing to your puppies accidents.

Safety Tips For Driving With Your Dog

driving, dog, car

Running errands or going on road trips with your furry friend is an increasingly common practice these days. Unfortunately, most drivers don’t consider the dangers posed by having an unrestrained dog in the car. Keep reading to learn of common dangers associated with driving in the company of an unrestrained dog, and some need to know safety tips.

A Road Paved with Good Intentions

“My dog is calm and doesn’t move around.”

“My dog is too small to cause a problem.”

“I can protect my dog better if he’s in my lap.”

Above are just some of the excuses used to justify allowing dogs unlimited access in cars. While these sentiments surely come from a place of love, they don’t negate the potential for distraction and harm.

Potential Driving Dangers

It is dangerous to have any dog, even a small one, lying in your lap while you drive. They could unexpectedly jump up and knock the steering wheel, block your vision or throw your car out of gear. Fido could crawl onto the floor and inhibit your ability to properly operate the pedals.

A dog riding with his head out an open car window makes most people smile. However, it’s actually an invitation for problems. Watching the faces Fido makes takes your attention off the road. Your dog may try to jump out to chase something, forcing you to focus on keeping him in the car.

Even a dog that normally rides well in the back seat may be tempted to jump into the front. Whether he lands on your lap or goes for the passenger seat, you’ll be focused on calming him down verses driving.

An unrestrained dog is also vulnerable to injury when you break, redirecting your attention from a potentially dangerous road situation to protecting your dog from harm.

Tips to Minimize the Risks

Here are some key tips for a safe car ride with your pet.

  • To help avoid spastic behavior from your canine while driving, let Fido get used to smaller car rides and slowly increase the distance as he gets more comfortable.
  • Never allow your pet to sit on your lap or in the front of the car while driving.
  • Avoid unnecessary injury by keeping your pet away from the bed of your pickup truck. If a car accident occurs, your dog will have no protection.
  • To avoid miscellaneous objects injuring your pet, do not allow Fido to stick his head out the window.
  • The final step to eliminating the distractions of driving with your dog is quite simple (no, you don’t have to leave him at home): restrain him in either a specialized harness or crate. Getting the right apparatus is key to keeping your dog comfortable, but a proper restraint not only keeps your focus on the road; it also keeps your dog safe.

Adding the above steps to your driving regime when traveling with Fido will help keep you and your canine family member safe. You can also help protect your dog from harmful free radicals by giving him NuVet Labs supplements. Protect your dog with NuVet Plus K-9 and by restraining him in the car.

5 Steps and Tips to Biking with Your Dog

biking, Fido, dog

If you are a bike-riding enthusiast and have considered biking with your dog by your side, continue reading. NuVet Labs, your pet’s best friend, list some important information about what you will need, what you should do and what to consider before taking Fido for a bike-run.

Dog Biking Supplies:

  • A non-tangling leash
  • Body harness
  • A lead baton
  • Reflective lights or tape – Reflective vests specifically made for dogs are also available
  • A collapsible container to hold water.

Step 1

Make sure to clear all physical activity that you and your pet plan on undertaking with your veterinarian first. Chances are you will get the green light. However, your veterinarian may also shed some light on something regarding your dog’s health that could surprise you, like hip or joint problems your pup may have.

Step 2

Get your dog familiar with your bike by walking your bike and your dog at the same time. You can also get an idea of your dog’s comfort level regarding the bike. Continue to do this until you feel your dog is ready for the next step.

Step 3

It’s time to get on the bike! Make sure that you ride at a pace that is easy for your dog. Like Fido, there is going to be a learning curve for you as well. Riding a bike with your dog running next to you is going to take some time for you to get used to.

Step 4

Bike with your dog consistently and regularly so you can build up Fido’s endurance. Before you know it, riding your bike with your dog will be easy.

Step 5

Enjoy the exercise benefits of a healthy, low-impact bike ride and the emotional benefits of spending quality time with your pup.

Tips:

  • Make sure your dog is suited for exercise. Certain breeds of dogs are not designed for endurance exercises and may get overheated, or will just be plain miserable.
  • If your dog is overweight, it’s a good idea to work on reducing his weight before beginning strenuous exercise.
  • Don’t leave your dog attached to the bike if you are not on it. Your bike could fall on your dog and cause injury.
  • Don’t attach the leash to the handlebars while riding as this cold turn the wheel and cause an accident or difficulty steering and balancing.
  • Biking with a puppy is not recommended. They are too small and more prone to injury.
  • Consider another way of transporting a puppy or smaller dog on your bike. There are baskets on the market that can be attached to your bike for this purpose.
  • Consider a dog trailer for your bike if you have an older dog or a larger dog that is not suited for running.
  • Don’t get frustrated with your pooch if she doesn’t really take to biking. It’s not for every dog.
  • A bike designed for trails, with wider tires is better suited for dog bike-running.

Pet Health

One way you can get your dog in running mode is by making sure they are in good health. You can help get your dog healthy by adding a nutritional supplement like NuVet Plus to their diet.

NuVet Plus is comprised of human grade ingredients and manufactured in an FDA approved lab. Trusted by dog parents around the United States and Canada, NuVet Plus has been chosen by the discerning families of canines for the benefits they have seen their dogs gain from a daily regimen of NuVet Plus.

The NuVet Plus supplement strengthens the immune system, promotes a healthy skin and coat, supports ear and eye health, improves digestion, and more. Dogs with joint issues have also benefited from NuJoint Plus, a nutritious supplement especially designed for joint health.To learn more about exceptional NuVet products, please visit nuvetonline.com.

Why Exercise Is Important For Your Pet

pets, exercise

Just like your human family members, your new pet needs plenty of exercise in order to live a healthy, happy life. However, it’s important to recognize your new addition’s limits. Then, you can develop an exercise routine that is appropriate for your puppy or kitten’s size, breed and temperament.

Your veterinarian can help you create an exercise routine that is beneficial for everyone in your home. Proper exercise can help diminish destructive behavior, avoid hyperactivity, develop good social skills, improve sleeping habits and allow your pet to maintain a healthy weight.

Beginning to Exercise

There are a few key things you must consider before beginning an exercise routine with your new puppy or kitten. For starters, you must make sure that both you and your pet are in good shape to exercise. You may want to consider a slight warm-up routine before you start with the rigorous exercise program.

For instance, start your puppy off by letting it run in circles a few times before taking a short walk. When you are done exercising, you will want to let your pet stretch a bit in order to prevent injury. Hold out a treat in front of your animal in order to make them take a bow and stretch their muscles.

Note that you can exercise your dog or kitten both indoors and outdoors. It is just important to choose a spot that is safe and comfortable for you and your pet. You don’t need a lot of supplies in order to work out with your pet — simply invest in a leash if you are taking your dog outdoors or buy a few toys that might stimulate some activity.

Exercise Tips for Puppies

  • Talk to your veterinarian about types of exercise that would be beneficial for your new pet. For example, a pug has a short and flat nose and might have a difficult time breathing on an extended walk or during vigorous exercise. Likewise, young puppies should not go on walks that are too long, as their bones are still growing and developing.
  • Include brain exercise routines to help develop your new puppy’s mental skills. Puzzle toys are perfect for helping your dog learn how to find treats and explore appropriate spaces. For example, a Kong is a common puzzle toy. This toy allows you as the pet owner to store a treat in the Kong toy. Your dog will have to think about how it will retrieve the snack. It not only keeps your dog occupied, but also provides your pet with mental stimulation.
  • Disguise exercise with fun play activities. A daily dose of playing will help you bond with your puppy, as well as get them to use up some of their excess energy. Fetch is always a great choice, and also teaches your dog a few things about obedience along the way.

Exercise Tips for Kittens

  • Kittens will get most of their exercise through play activities, and you should make it a point to play with your cat at different intervals throughout the day. At a minimum, cats should receive about 10-15 minutes of one-on-one play time with you.
  • Consider purchasing a scratch post or climbing tree for your new kitten. These toys encourage them to stretch their new muscles and develop good habits. A scratch post gives them an appropriate place to use their claws. It also helps file down the sharp points on their claws.
  • Be your kitten’s play mate. Remember, your cat’s no longer with its siblings, which help to teach it a lot of its social skills. Let your kitten romp with you, and gently let your new pet know when it is playing too rough.

In addition to developing a well-rounded exercise routine for your pet, you also need to make sure all of their nutritional needs are being met. Choosing a healthy pet food with plenty of protein is a good start, but don’t forget to include pet nutrition supplements such as the one’s offered by NuVet Labs. The NuVet puppy and kitten supplements are designed to enhance your pet’s diet to ensure it is getting all of the essential vitamins and minerals, allowing it to have the best start in life.