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Jealousy: Dealing with a Jealous Pet

jealousy, jealous pet, dog

Just like you, your pet will experience different emotions on different days. After a long walk to the park, your dog might feel exhausted and happy. If you scolded your dog for being disobedient, it might tuck its tail under and sulk in the corner. One emotion that animals can experience is jealousy. Jealousy can be directed toward a new pet in the house or a new family member, such as a newborn infant.

While jealousy is normal in most circumstances, pet parents should know how to address this issue before it becomes a larger problem.

Tips for Dealing with a Jealous Pet

If you are introducing a new family member into the home, furry or otherwise, follow the below steps to help ease potential jealousy.

Equal Affection

If you’ve recently brought a new pet into the home, be sure to split up your time evenly between pets. Although it’s tempting to focus on your new family member, your established pet needs equal time.

If you spend 30 minutes training a new puppy, be sure to spend 30 minutes playing exclusively with your cat. Likewise, if you reward your new puppy with a tasty treat, like a NuVet Plus wafer, make sure you treat your other pet as well.

When your cat knows that you will still spend time with them, their feelings of jealousy will likely subside quicker.


Establish boundaries for the new addition in your home. For instance, if you have brought home a new puppy and your first dog is feeling jealous, be sure to keep their toys separate.

Do not allow the new puppy to gnaw on the first dog’s toys. The same goes for when a new baby arrives — be sure that the dog and the baby have their own play things, and try to establish proper social boundaries.

Stick to Routine

Try to avoid disrupting your original pet’s routine. Pets can become quite accustomed to their routine, and it helps them to feel safe and secure.

If you bring home a new pet or baby, try to make sure that your first pet stays on the same schedule. Abiding by the same schedule will help your original pet maintain a sense of normalcy. The less change to your first pet’s everyday life, the less it will feel like its life has been disrupted.

Quality Time

Be sure to spend some alone time each day with your original pet. In many cases, a jealous pet simply wants more attention from its owner. By giving your first pet special time with just you, it won’t be as apt to jealousy of another pet or baby in the house.

Take your dog for a walk, or spend time scratching your cat’s belly. Make it a priority to fit in a few minutes of uninterrupted time with your pet each day.

A Healthy Pet

Of course, it’s important to keep your pet’s mind, body and spirit healthy at all times. The best way to do this is to add a pet nutritional supplement, such as NuVet Plus, to their diet.

This specialized formula is created with the highest-quality ingredients, and will ensure that all your pet’s nutritional needs are met. To find out more about the benefits of NuVet Plus and NuJoint Plus, follow NuVet Labs on Facebook today.

Potty Training Your Pup: How to Limit Accidents During Bad Weather

potty training, dogs, snow

No one likes going outside in the cold and rain, sleet or snow. Imagine having to go to the bathroom in it; now you too can understand your dog’s world. Why go outside to use the restroom, where its cold and uncomfortable, when they can just relieve themselves inside, in the warmth?


Luckily for both of you, there are some easy-to-follow  potty training strategies that will help Fido feel more comfortable eliminating in poor weather.

Potty Training Tips and Tricks

For a dog still undergoing initial house training, make going out in bad weather part of the training. Don’t allow a dog who still goes to the bathroom inside sometimes to do so all the time during rough weather.

Get him used to doing his business in the elements. Take him out on leash and use a command word, such as “potty” or “tinkle,” to indicate it’s time to go.

Begin by saying the word right before he’s about to go and praise or treat him after. As he learns what the word means, say it even if he isn’t indicating so he’ll eliminate on cue, making a trip outside quick and easy.

Create a Safe Space

If your dog is deterred by the snow, clear a space for your pooch. Shovel a potty spot that is large enough for your canine companion to sniff and circle in before eliminating.

During potty training, continue to use the same cleared area each time Fido needs to eliminate. If this strategy is unsuccessful, or if you are unable to clear an area, you can also place a fresh patch right outside your door for your pup to use as a restroom. Fresh patch is a portable patch of grass that you can place anywhere you like to encourage elimination.

If your dog is older and already housebroken, but he’s resistant to going when the weather is bad, revert to taking him out on leash after each meal and teach him the command word. Do this even in good weather until he understands the request.

Dress for the Occasion

Before taking your pooch outside in the snow, you bundle up with a thick coat. Remember, Fido gets cold too and could use a little warmth in extreme weather.

If your dog has a short haired coat, consider utilizing canine clothing to make him more comfortable. Warm booties can be purchased to keep your dog’s paws warm and comfortable. Doggy sweaters are also an effective and stylish option for Fido.

The Potty Game

Encourage your pooch to potty outside by rewarding a job well done. You should regularly take your dog outside during the day to give him a change to eliminate. When he potties outside, instead of inside, celebrate!

Let Fido know that he did a good job with enthusiastic praise or affection. You can even reward him with a special doggy treat. This is a great time to give them their daily NuVet Plus & NuJoint wafers!

Once your doggy is done eliminating, follow his lead. Reward him by continuing to explore, or going back into the warmth, whatever your canine companion prefers.

Indoor Accommodations

Sometimes the weather is dangerous – strong wind, lightning, hail – making it safer for you and your dog to stay inside.

Newspapers are a worst-case scenario option; potty pads or patches of fake sod are more reliable and sanitary choices for indoor bathrooms. Walk your dog over on leash and give the command word, rewarding him enthusiastically when he eliminates in the proper spot.

If there’s a covered spot outside, protected from the elements, train your dog to go there in bad weather.

Indoors or outdoors, always follow elimination in the correct spot with a reward – praise, petting, food or playtime – and check out NuVet Labs Facebook for more doggy information!

Harness vs. Collar: What’s Best for Your Dog

collar, harness, dogs, walking, pulling

“The walk” is often the main event in a dog’s day. Unfortunately, it’s just as often the biggest hassle of yours. If your dog pulls, wiggles or resists keeping up with your pace, you may come to dread the whole exercise. Using the right collar or harness can make all the difference.

Collar Pros

Most people are familiar with the flat collar, made of cloth or leather and closed with a clasp or buckle. It’s ideal for canine identification tags, but it’s not always the best option for walking.

If your dog doesn’t pull on walks and isn’t a breed known for breathing problems, a flat collar is a fine option. Some dogs do not like the way a harness feels and prefer to wear a flat collar.

Slip Collar

A martingale, or slip, collar is a variation on a flat collar. It has the same look and shape of a flat collar. However, it features a section that gently becomes flush with your dog’s neck when he pulls or moves backwards.

The slight pressure acts as a correction while preventing your dog from slipping out of his collar. It is a good option for dogs with thick necks, like bulldogs or pit bulls, or breeds with little difference in size between their head and necks.

Head Collar

A head collar is a third alternative, ideal for serious pullers or dogs that outweigh and therefore overpower you on a walk. They sit at the base of the head and wrap around the muzzle with a leash attached under the chin.

It allows you to direct the dog’s attention when he pulls away without putting strain on his throat or building the neck and back muscles, which would only make him better at pulling.

Head collars can be controversial. Partaking in more research before making a decision is encouraged.


Although collars are convenient for ID tags, they can have a negative impact on some dogs. For example, pulling in a collar can increase the probability of a neck injury.

They are also not ideal for training purposes, since they offer less control.

Harness Pros

Any dogs with flat muzzles, including pugs or bulldogs, have predispositions to health issues with the throat or spine. These breeds are best served by a harness. Back-attaching harnesses work well for these dogs, as the leash attachment on the back applies less pressure during correction.

A harness is also ideal for dogs with respiratory issues or neck concerns. In a harness, the pulling or corrections do not put pressure directly on the neck. Likewise, a harness can aid dogs who have difficulties getting up  by providing lift assistance.

Harnesses offer more control, which make them ideal for training. They discourage pulling since they do not allow Fido to gain forward movement, which is great for dogs who get distracted easily.

For larger dogs with pulling issues, a front-attaching harness is preferred. The leash correction coming from the front gives you more control.

The attachment is between the legs and tightens when pulled. It is also less likely to come off accidentally since it wraps around the dogs body.

Harness Cons

Although harnesses do not harm your dog, some dogs find them to be uncomfortable. Walking your dog on a harness as early as possible improves the chances that your pup will be willing to cooperate.

Certain types of harnesses have also been found to be less effective. For example, a back-clip is generally the most comfortable but it does not offer much control for a dog that likes to pull.

Maybe you like the control provided by a harness, but you also like how easy it is to place ID tags on a collar. Luckily, you can have both! You can keep Fido’s collar on, with the ID tags attached, and add the harness when you and Fido go for a walk.

Hopefully we have been able to help clarify the pros and cons that come with a collar or harness so you can pick the right tool for your canine companion. For more doggy tips and canine entertainment, follow NuVet Labs on Facebook.

Safety Tips For Driving With Your Dog

driving, dog, car

Running errands or going on road trips with your furry friend is an increasingly common practice these days. Unfortunately, most drivers don’t consider the dangers posed by having an unrestrained dog in the car. Keep reading to learn of common dangers associated with driving in the company of an unrestrained dog, and some need to know safety tips.

A Road Paved with Good Intentions

“My dog is calm and doesn’t move around.”

“My dog is too small to cause a problem.”

“I can protect my dog better if he’s in my lap.”

Above are just some of the excuses used to justify allowing dogs unlimited access in cars. While these sentiments surely come from a place of love, they don’t negate the potential for distraction and harm.

Potential Driving Dangers

It is dangerous to have any dog, even a small one, lying in your lap while you drive. They could unexpectedly jump up and knock the steering wheel, block your vision or throw your car out of gear. Fido could crawl onto the floor and inhibit your ability to properly operate the pedals.

A dog riding with his head out an open car window makes most people smile. However, it’s actually an invitation for problems. Watching the faces Fido makes takes your attention off the road. Your dog may try to jump out to chase something, forcing you to focus on keeping him in the car.

Even a dog that normally rides well in the back seat may be tempted to jump into the front. Whether he lands on your lap or goes for the passenger seat, you’ll be focused on calming him down verses driving.

An unrestrained dog is also vulnerable to injury when you break, redirecting your attention from a potentially dangerous road situation to protecting your dog from harm.

Tips to Minimize the Risks

Here are some key tips for a safe car ride with your pet.

  • To help avoid spastic behavior from your canine while driving, let Fido get used to smaller car rides and slowly increase the distance as he gets more comfortable.
  • Never allow your pet to sit on your lap or in the front of the car while driving.
  • Avoid unnecessary injury by keeping your pet away from the bed of your pickup truck. If a car accident occurs, your dog will have no protection.
  • To avoid miscellaneous objects injuring your pet, do not allow Fido to stick his head out the window.
  • The final step to eliminating the distractions of driving with your dog is quite simple (no, you don’t have to leave him at home): restrain him in either a specialized harness or crate. Getting the right apparatus is key to keeping your dog comfortable, but a proper restraint not only keeps your focus on the road; it also keeps your dog safe.

Adding the above steps to your driving regime when traveling with Fido will help keep you and your canine family member safe. You can also help protect your dog from harmful free radicals by giving him NuVet Labs supplements. Protect your dog with NuVet Plus K-9 and by restraining him in the car.

How To Become a Dog Trainer: Helpful Hints

dog trainer

Let’s face it. You love dogs! You feel like you really connect with the canine world and understand doggie behavior. As a result, you want to become a professional dog trainer and you are comfortable with the idea of devoting your time and energy to the well being of these amazing creatures.

Unfortunately, you cannot track down any kind of mandatory state or federal certifications that will allow you to make it official and share your expertise with the dog owning public. You ask yourself, what does a person need to do to become a dog trainer? Continue reading and we will help show you how you, too, can become a dog trainer.

Educate Yourself

Since there currently are no state or federal requirements in place for what is needed to be a professional dog trainer, one of the most important things you can do is learn as much as possible about dogs and dog behaviors. This means reading books, watching videos and spending as much time as you can around dogs.

Two good places to start are your local library and the internet. At your local library, you should be able to find books on the topic of dog training and the various methods that experienced dog trainers use in their field. The internet is also a valuable tool to utilize, with videos and articles about all things dog training.

There are also dog training certification programs available that you can participate in for hands on instruction. However, the first step to becoming a dog trainer is to get a dog that you can train.

Sign Up For an Obedience Class with Your Dog

An excellent way to see what is involved in a typical dog training session is to take part in one. If you have a dog, you also have the perfect opportunity to get out there and get your feet wet.

There are many ways to get into a class. Various pet supply stores offer in-house training at their locations that puppy parents and their dogs can take part in. Maybe you may want to go the route of doing an in-home private session with a trainer. Perhaps you may want to try both ways?

If you are in a class with other dogs and parents, you will get to see how the training is carried out in a group. Being in a group also exposes you to different people and dog breeds, both of which are valuable experiences. In a private session you have the dog trainer at your disposal and will have lots of opportunities to ask questions and pick their brain, so to speak, about the world of dog training and how to get started.

Breed Exposure

Try and expose yourself to as many breeds of dog, and dogs in general, as possible. Visit with friends who have different kinds of dogs or volunteer at animal shelters, which always have a myriad of dogs.

You may also choose to spend time volunteering or working with a rescue that is breed specific. Fortunately, most of these organizations can always use the help. The Internet can assist you in tracking down these organizations and point you in the right direction.

Apprenticeship and Practice

After you feel comfortable in the fun and challenging world of dog training, see if you can find a dog trainer to take you under their wing (or paw) so that you can learn the ins and outs of the business.

An apprenticeship will allow you to see how somebody makes a living as a trainer. Working with somebody in the business will also be helpful when it comes time to create a resume or portfolio of your work and experience. Another great way to hone your skills is to volunteer at animal shelters and offer to train and work with the dogs there.

Helpful Hints for a Future Dog Trainer

  • Set realistic expectations. It could take months or years to hone your craft.
  • A good dog trainer is always learning new things and seeking out information.
  • Keep detailed notes of your experiences & knowledge development.
  • Training is about working with dogs & their people – expect to encounter all kinds of personalities.

Working with dogs and their families can be a very rewarding and uplifting experience. For NuVet, keeping dogs healthy is rewarding, which is why we created NuVet Plus.

NuVet Plus is a nutritious vitamin supplement for dogs and cats. We regularly receive testimonials from happy NuVet families about how NuVet Plus has helped improve the health of their pets.  Learn more about how NuVet Plus can help improve the health of your pet.

Agility Training For Dogs: The Basics

agility training, dogs, nuvet

Dog agility training is a wonderful activity for many reasons. For example, agility training allows your dog to get mental and physical exercise. It is a fun, but serious, game for your pet; and most importantly, it creates a special bond between the two of you that strengthens your relationship. However, before starting to train your dog, you should know the basics.

What Is Agility Training?

In the simplest terms, agility is an obstacle course for your dog. Dog agility is a popular sport with competitive events. The handler directs their dog to complete various tasks, including going through tunnels, over tables, moving boards, jumping over bars and weaving through poles.

The agility course mimics movements that your dog would utilize if they were hunting. For example, jumping over logs, climbing steep surfaces, squeezing between bushes, and running quickly to catch up with prey. The agility obstacles help fulfill your pups natural instincts.

You (the handler) and your dog stay in constant contact through body language and quick verbal cues. Your canine family member relies on you to guide them through the course.Trust, clear communication, and teamwork are essential for success at the sport and in creating a stronger bond between you and your dog. Assisting your dog through agility courses will also help reinforce basic obedience commands that are used in everyday life.

Your Dog…

All breeds and sizes can participate in agility training and competition. However, you must evaluate your dog’s physical and mental health to determine if he would do well with agility. In order to be a good fit, your dog should respond well to your commands and enjoy being around people and other dogs.

The pace and demands on the body require that your dog be in good physical health. Joints can take a beating in agility, so consider adding NuJoint Plus dog hip and joint supplement and NuVet Plus from NuVet Labs to your potential competitor’s diet. If your dog doesn’t enjoy running or marches to the beat of his own drummer, he may not enjoy agility.

…And You

Just like your dog, you must possess the physical stamina to complete agility courses. You can navigate from a distance if running isn’t for you, but it requires specific instruction from a qualified trainer.

You should also consider the time and money you have to put towards the sport. To reap the full benefits of agility – bonding, exercise and mental stimulation – you have to work at it regularly. Whether you attend a group, a private agility class, or you purchase equipment to train at your home, cost is a factor. Quality equipment is essential for your dog’s safety.

Getting Started

If you decide to embark on agility training with your dog, begin by assuring his physical health. Agility is a great form of exercise for your canine companion. It will help him strengthen his muscles, stay fit, improve endurance, and burn excess energy.  Before beginning your agility training, start your dog on the right foot by putting him on the path to perfect health with a high-quality nutritional supplement.