Category Archives: knowledge articles

Jealousy: Dealing with a Jealous Pet

jealousy, jealous pet, dog

Just like you, your pet will experience different emotions on different days. After a long walk to the park, your dog might feel exhausted and happy. If you scolded your dog for being disobedient, it might tuck its tail under and sulk in the corner. One emotion that animals can experience is jealousy. Jealousy can be directed toward a new pet in the house or a new family member, such as a newborn infant.

While jealousy is normal in most circumstances, pet parents should know how to address this issue before it becomes a larger problem.

Tips for Dealing with a Jealous Pet

If you are introducing a new family member into the home, furry or otherwise, follow the below steps to help ease potential jealousy.

Equal Affection

If you’ve recently brought a new pet into the home, be sure to split up your time evenly between pets. Although it’s tempting to focus on your new family member, your established pet needs equal time.

If you spend 30 minutes training a new puppy, be sure to spend 30 minutes playing exclusively with your cat. Likewise, if you reward your new puppy with a tasty treat, like a NuVet Plus wafer, make sure you treat your other pet as well.

When your cat knows that you will still spend time with them, their feelings of jealousy will likely subside quicker.

Boundaries

Establish boundaries for the new addition in your home. For instance, if you have brought home a new puppy and your first dog is feeling jealous, be sure to keep their toys separate.

Do not allow the new puppy to gnaw on the first dog’s toys. The same goes for when a new baby arrives — be sure that the dog and the baby have their own play things, and try to establish proper social boundaries.

Stick to Routine

Try to avoid disrupting your original pet’s routine. Pets can become quite accustomed to their routine, and it helps them to feel safe and secure.

If you bring home a new pet or baby, try to make sure that your first pet stays on the same schedule. Abiding by the same schedule will help your original pet maintain a sense of normalcy. The less change to your first pet’s everyday life, the less it will feel like its life has been disrupted.

Quality Time

Be sure to spend some alone time each day with your original pet. In many cases, a jealous pet simply wants more attention from its owner. By giving your first pet special time with just you, it won’t be as apt to jealousy of another pet or baby in the house.

Take your dog for a walk, or spend time scratching your cat’s belly. Make it a priority to fit in a few minutes of uninterrupted time with your pet each day.

A Healthy Pet

Of course, it’s important to keep your pet’s mind, body and spirit healthy at all times. The best way to do this is to add a pet nutritional supplement, such as NuVet Plus, to their diet.

This specialized formula is created with the highest-quality ingredients, and will ensure that all your pet’s nutritional needs are met. To find out more about the benefits of NuVet Plus and NuJoint Plus, follow NuVet Labs on Facebook today.

Potty Training Your Pup: How to Limit Accidents During Bad Weather

potty training, dogs, snow

No one likes going outside in the cold and rain, sleet or snow. Imagine having to go to the bathroom in it; now you too can understand your dog’s world. Why go outside to use the restroom, where its cold and uncomfortable, when they can just relieve themselves inside, in the warmth?

 

Luckily for both of you, there are some easy-to-follow  potty training strategies that will help Fido feel more comfortable eliminating in poor weather.

Potty Training Tips and Tricks

For a dog still undergoing initial house training, make going out in bad weather part of the training. Don’t allow a dog who still goes to the bathroom inside sometimes to do so all the time during rough weather.

Get him used to doing his business in the elements. Take him out on leash and use a command word, such as “potty” or “tinkle,” to indicate it’s time to go.

Begin by saying the word right before he’s about to go and praise or treat him after. As he learns what the word means, say it even if he isn’t indicating so he’ll eliminate on cue, making a trip outside quick and easy.

Create a Safe Space

If your dog is deterred by the snow, clear a space for your pooch. Shovel a potty spot that is large enough for your canine companion to sniff and circle in before eliminating.

During potty training, continue to use the same cleared area each time Fido needs to eliminate. If this strategy is unsuccessful, or if you are unable to clear an area, you can also place a fresh patch right outside your door for your pup to use as a restroom. Fresh patch is a portable patch of grass that you can place anywhere you like to encourage elimination.

If your dog is older and already housebroken, but he’s resistant to going when the weather is bad, revert to taking him out on leash after each meal and teach him the command word. Do this even in good weather until he understands the request.

Dress for the Occasion

Before taking your pooch outside in the snow, you bundle up with a thick coat. Remember, Fido gets cold too and could use a little warmth in extreme weather.

If your dog has a short haired coat, consider utilizing canine clothing to make him more comfortable. Warm booties can be purchased to keep your dog’s paws warm and comfortable. Doggy sweaters are also an effective and stylish option for Fido.

The Potty Game

Encourage your pooch to potty outside by rewarding a job well done. You should regularly take your dog outside during the day to give him a change to eliminate. When he potties outside, instead of inside, celebrate!

Let Fido know that he did a good job with enthusiastic praise or affection. You can even reward him with a special doggy treat. This is a great time to give them their daily NuVet Plus & NuJoint wafers!

Once your doggy is done eliminating, follow his lead. Reward him by continuing to explore, or going back into the warmth, whatever your canine companion prefers.

Indoor Accommodations

Sometimes the weather is dangerous – strong wind, lightning, hail – making it safer for you and your dog to stay inside.

Newspapers are a worst-case scenario option; potty pads or patches of fake sod are more reliable and sanitary choices for indoor bathrooms. Walk your dog over on leash and give the command word, rewarding him enthusiastically when he eliminates in the proper spot.

If there’s a covered spot outside, protected from the elements, train your dog to go there in bad weather.

Indoors or outdoors, always follow elimination in the correct spot with a reward – praise, petting, food or playtime – and check out NuVet Labs Facebook for more doggy information!

Harness vs. Collar: What’s Best for Your Dog

collar, harness, dogs, walking, pulling

“The walk” is often the main event in a dog’s day. Unfortunately, it’s just as often the biggest hassle of yours. If your dog pulls, wiggles or resists keeping up with your pace, you may come to dread the whole exercise. Using the right collar or harness can make all the difference.

Collar Pros

Most people are familiar with the flat collar, made of cloth or leather and closed with a clasp or buckle. It’s ideal for canine identification tags, but it’s not always the best option for walking.

If your dog doesn’t pull on walks and isn’t a breed known for breathing problems, a flat collar is a fine option. Some dogs do not like the way a harness feels and prefer to wear a flat collar.

Slip Collar

A martingale, or slip, collar is a variation on a flat collar. It has the same look and shape of a flat collar. However, it features a section that gently becomes flush with your dog’s neck when he pulls or moves backwards.

The slight pressure acts as a correction while preventing your dog from slipping out of his collar. It is a good option for dogs with thick necks, like bulldogs or pit bulls, or breeds with little difference in size between their head and necks.

Head Collar

A head collar is a third alternative, ideal for serious pullers or dogs that outweigh and therefore overpower you on a walk. They sit at the base of the head and wrap around the muzzle with a leash attached under the chin.

It allows you to direct the dog’s attention when he pulls away without putting strain on his throat or building the neck and back muscles, which would only make him better at pulling.

Head collars can be controversial. Partaking in more research before making a decision is encouraged.

Cons

Although collars are convenient for ID tags, they can have a negative impact on some dogs. For example, pulling in a collar can increase the probability of a neck injury.

They are also not ideal for training purposes, since they offer less control.

Harness Pros

Any dogs with flat muzzles, including pugs or bulldogs, have predispositions to health issues with the throat or spine. These breeds are best served by a harness. Back-attaching harnesses work well for these dogs, as the leash attachment on the back applies less pressure during correction.

A harness is also ideal for dogs with respiratory issues or neck concerns. In a harness, the pulling or corrections do not put pressure directly on the neck. Likewise, a harness can aid dogs who have difficulties getting up  by providing lift assistance.

Harnesses offer more control, which make them ideal for training. They discourage pulling since they do not allow Fido to gain forward movement, which is great for dogs who get distracted easily.

For larger dogs with pulling issues, a front-attaching harness is preferred. The leash correction coming from the front gives you more control.

The attachment is between the legs and tightens when pulled. It is also less likely to come off accidentally since it wraps around the dogs body.

Harness Cons

Although harnesses do not harm your dog, some dogs find them to be uncomfortable. Walking your dog on a harness as early as possible improves the chances that your pup will be willing to cooperate.

Certain types of harnesses have also been found to be less effective. For example, a back-clip is generally the most comfortable but it does not offer much control for a dog that likes to pull.

Maybe you like the control provided by a harness, but you also like how easy it is to place ID tags on a collar. Luckily, you can have both! You can keep Fido’s collar on, with the ID tags attached, and add the harness when you and Fido go for a walk.

Hopefully we have been able to help clarify the pros and cons that come with a collar or harness so you can pick the right tool for your canine companion. For more doggy tips and canine entertainment, follow NuVet Labs on Facebook.

Dealing with Aggression: Help Keep Your Child Safe

aggression, dogs, kids, children

Dogs and children seem to be the perfect pairing. Both love to run, play, share height restrictions, have an abundance of energy and neither of them pay rent. Yet, out of the estimated 368,245 treated dog bites reported in 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calculates that the highest injury rate occurred for children between ages of 5 and 9. Controlling aggression requires training both your dog and your children.

At NuVet Labs, pet health and safety is our passion. This is why we want to share the below information to help keep your two-legged and four-legged children safe.

Roots of Aggression Towards Children

Even the sweetest, most gentle family pet is capable of biting. It’s a natural defense mechanism for animals, even domesticated ones.

Dogs that aren’t properly socialized by four months of age may not react well to children. Their movements, voices and even their sizes are different from adults. A dog that is not socialized may not make the connection that kids are simply smaller humans.

Kids also behave unpredictably around dogs. When children see furry canines, they tend to get excited and want rush play with dog. When excited, they’re less aware of boundaries and their sudden movements may startle a dog.

A child may approach a dog as he eats or plays with a toy, making the dog think he has to guard his “valuable.” Children are also known to poke, pull and jump all over dogs like they’re inanimate stuffed animals. Unfortunately, dogs do respond to discomfort and fear, often with a snap or a bite.

Always Supervise

Supervising your child’s interactions with your – or any – dog allows you to intervene if something goes awry. Keep a close eye on your child to be aware of the below potential signs of aggression.

A general progression of agitation in a normally non-aggressive dog is often:

Stopping what he’s doing, sometimes along with a hard stare at the child

  • Raised hackles
  • Lunging
  • Stiff or rigid stance
  • Baring of teeth with a growl or snarl
  • Snapping – this is a warning, not a failed bite
  • Biting – some dogs will temper their bites to avoid serious harm, but others will not.

Working with Your Dog

Basic obedience training is essential for any dog. When you can ask for and immediately receive a command, you hold the key to diffusing a tense situation.

If your canine companion does not catch on to commands immediately, a tasty treat can be a good incentive to help motive him. Once Fido follows the commands ten times in a row, with the treat as an incentive, you can move on to only using praise or affection to show him that he is doing well.

Don’t be Afraid to Ask a Professional

Always receive help from a professional when working to correct aggressive tendencies in dogs. A professional will be able to outline a training routine that will help correct the type of aggression your dog is expressing and teach you how to implement the training tools correctly.

One training tool, recommended by the ASPCA, is the “Statue Game.” The “Statue Game” can be used to teach your dog proper interactions with kids. The kids will “go crazy” until you say “freeze.” When they stop, ask your dog to sit and then reward him. As he learns the game, he’ll sit whenever the movement stops.

Working with Your Kids

A child who understands how to interact with dogs is safer in their presence. Always require your kids to ask permission before petting a dog they don’t know. Never allow them to reach through a fence or window to pet a dog.

Teach them how to properly pet a dog using a stuffed animal and instruct them to leave a dog alone when he starts to show signs of aggression or agitation. As they get older, explain to them why poking, pulling and rough-housing with dogs is unacceptable.

House Training: Stop Accidents Before They Happen

House training your puppy is a necessity. No one wants a pet who eliminates wherever they want. Although dogs can be potty trained at any age, the earlier it’s done, the sooner you’ll see success.

The one exception to this is puppies under 12 weeks of age. This is because they have little to no control over their bladders. You can begin training with your puppy before he’s 12 weeks, but anticipate more accidents during this time.

Formulate Your House Training Plan

Preparation begins even before your puppy comes home. Create a plan based on your lifestyle and living situation, then purchase the supplies you need.

Unless someone will be home with the puppy all day, you’ll need to keep him in a safe, designated area. You can use a crate, a room with a closed door, or section off an area with a baby gate.

If you’re using a room of the house, be sure it has bare floors rather than carpeting or rugs so accidents don’t get soaked up while you’re away. Remove any items the puppy could chew on or get caught up in, including window blind cords and electrical wires. Puppy pads are recommended in this situation.

Using a Crate

If you’re going to crate train your puppy, decide what size crate you want to purchase. Do you want to purchase a crate that fits him now, or one he will grow into? A non-house trained puppy should have just enough room inside the crate to stand up, turn around and lie down.

The rule of thumb is to get a crate one-and-a-half times the length of the dog from his nose to the start of his tail. However, if you know your puppy will be much larger when full-grown, you can begin with a crate big enough for his adult size as long as you can attach partitions that will limit his access to the appropriate amount of space.

Leave the bottom of the crate bare. Puppies normally will not lie in their own urine. Therefore, limit the space in the crate to the room he needs to sleep, with nothing absorbent to pee on.

No matter the method you choose for house training, the most important and abundant supply you’ll need is patience.

Getting Started

Several rules of thumb will help you through the house training process.

  • Until your puppy has shown he understands the concept of eliminating in a designated area, keep him with you on a leash whenever he’s in the house. This allows you to quickly escort him outside if he looks like he’s about to go to the bathroom.
  • Puppies generally can hold their bladders for as many hours as they are months old plus one. For instance, a 4-month old puppy will likely be able to hold his urine for 5 hours. Therefore, if you leave your puppy alone for longer than that, expect to come home to an accident.
  • Never punish your puppy for an accident. It will only serve to create fear in him whenever he has to eliminate. If you catch him in the act, make a quick, sharp noise to get his attention, but not scare him, then quickly take him outside or to the puppy pad to finish. Praise him with words and petting when he finishes properly.
  • If he has an accident outside of your view, do not react when you find it. He won’t understand that you’re yelling or punishing him for something he did minutes before. Simply put the dog in another room and use an odor-eliminating cleaner on the spot.

Setting a Routine

Dogs respond well to structure. Create a routine for house training. No matter your schedule, try to stick as closely to the routine as possible every day.

1.Morning Elimination

Begin each morning with a trip outside on the leash. Give your puppy 5 minutes to eliminate. Immediately upon finishing – not before so you don’t startle him – praise him for it. Remain outside for another 10 minutes to ensure he empties his bladder and bowels completely.

Puppies don’t always totally eliminate in one squatting. If you bring him inside immediately after going, he will learn to hold it just to get more time outside.

If your puppy doesn’t go in the first 5 minutes, bring him back inside. Once inside, confine him in his crate, a small penned-in area or tether him to you with constant supervision. Continue to take him outside on leash every 15 to 30 minutes until you get a successful elimination, as described above.

2.Supervised Free Time

After the extra 10 minutes, come back inside and give the puppy supervised “free time” for 10 to 30 minutes.

When the puppy has developed manners in the house – not chewing on items or jumping on furniture – you can drop the leash to the floor and allow the dog to follow you around. Grabbing the leash if the puppy acts up or tries to wander off still gives you control over his actions.

3.Before and After Breakfast

Take him out again to go potty before you feed him breakfast. If he doesn’t go in the first 5 minutes, feed him in his crate or confined area to keep an eye on him.

Don’t give him more than 10 to 20 minutes to eat and drink, then take him outside immediately after he’s done. The additional 10 minutes is especially important after eating, even though he’ll likely relieve himself very quickly after a meal.

4.Getting Ready for Your Day

Bring him back inside as you get ready for your day, keeping him tethered to a heavy object in your view. Take him outside again after this resting period.

If you don’t get a successful elimination, bring him back in and confine him while you finish getting ready. Try one more trip outside before beginning your day.

Going to Work

If you work outside of the home and the puppy will be left alone for an extended time, be sure to take him outside to eliminate and exercise him just before you leave. Then put him in his crate or confined area with a small amount of water and a toy or two for entertainment.

If you will be home with him all day, continue the routine of taking him out after resting, eating or drinking water.

If someone won’t be home within the maximum time your puppy can hold his bladder, leave puppy pads in his area. Ideally, he’ll have an enclosed area near the door you take him through when eliminating outside. Leave his crate open inside the area and puppy pads placed as close to the exit door as possible.

Returning Home

When you return home, immediately take your puppy outside to eliminate, and then play with him for half-an-hour in the yard. Leash him to encourage elimination before returning inside.

Give him 30 minutes of supervised free time as you change or prepare dinner.
After he eats, take him outside immediately and follow the same routine as breakfast.

The rest of the evening should feature a walk, play time, obedience training and multiple trips outside to eliminate. Pull your dog’s water bowl at least 2 hours prior to bed time and take him out immediately before putting him in his crate or pen for the night.

Although your puppy may hold his bladder until morning, be prepared for middle-of-the-night potty breaks when he’s young. If he normally begins to whine around 3 a.m. and has to eliminate, set an alarm for 2:30 a.m. and take him out before the whining starts. This will discourage a tendency to cry simply to be let out of the crate or pen.

Advanced Behaviors

When your puppy has consistently eliminated successfully for several days or a week, you can begin to give him the “go potty” cue when you see him squat, circle or sniff the ground, indicating his need to go.

He will eventually learn this cue like “sit” and “stay,” allowing you to instruct him to eliminate when and where you want. Your puppy may eventually learn to go to the door you take him out of when he needs to eliminate, but you can easily reinforce or train this behavior.

Attach a small bell to or near the door and use the puppy’s paw to ring it before you take him out each time. Or simply use his paw to tap the door once or twice. He will learn that this behavior results in him being let outside.

Tips to Keep in Mind

  • While puppies usually need to eliminate almost immediately after eating, drinking or resting, even adult dogs tend to have to go within 15 to 30 minutes after these activities.
  • During the house training process, always praise your puppy after a successful elimination. It reinforces the behavior you want.
  • Always accompany your leashed puppy during house training to be sure he goes to the bathroom. Don’t assume he eliminated because you let him go outside.
  • If you don’t have a yard to take your puppy into, substitute puppy pads for some of the trips outdoors, using the same timing and routines.
  • If your puppy consistently has accidents despite a training routine, take him to the veterinarian to see if there can be something else contributing to your puppies accidents.

Why Crate Training Is Not What You Think

crate, crate training

The first step in crate training your puppy is erasing any preconceived notions you have that putting him in his crate is a bad thing. Because dogs are pack animals, the den-like feeling that a crate provides often makes them feel safe and comfortable.

Never make going in the crate a punishment. When done properly, crate training will help you with house training, separation concerns, problem behaviors and traveling.

Crate Guidelines

Most crates are wire or molded plastic. Either will work for training, but the molded plastic type gives your puppy a more den-like feeling. Your dog should be able to stand up comfortably in his den, turn around and lie down.

The length should be about one-and-one-half times the length of your dog, not including his tail. Once your puppy is potty trained, you can increase the size if he’ll be enclosed in it for extended periods.

Location, Location, Location

Keep the crate in an area you and your family spend time in, but not in the midst of a lot of commotion. While you don’t want your puppy isolated in the basement, you also don’t want him inside the front door.

Your puppy should feel like he’s part of the family, but not be driven to distraction by all the activity around him. It helps to leave a toy or two in the crate for your puppy. However, do not include any blankets, bedding or other absorbent items until he is fully house trained.

Duration

A puppy should not be in the crate for more hours than the number of months old he is, plus one. For example, if your puppy is 2 months old, he should never be left in his den, even if you are around, for more than 3 hours at a time.

Adult, house-trained dogs who have recently been exercised can spend 8 to 9 hours in a row without any problems. No dog should spend more than 12 hours total in a crate in any 24-hour period. For instance, if your adult dog spends 8 hours in his crate sleeping, he should not be in the crate for more than 4 hours total during the rest of the day.

Steps to Successful Training

1. Be ready when you bring your puppy home

Begin conditioning your puppy to the crate right away. If you bring him home for the first time and the crate is already set up, leave a few treats, or NuVet wafers, inside and let him explore it on his own.

2. Don’t make a fuss

If you introduce it after your puppy has been home, act like it’s not a big deal. Don’t make a fuss over it and he’ll likely sniff it out on his own.

Again, place some treats inside to encourage exploration. Put his food bowl in the back of the crate and allow him to eat inside with the door open.

3. Sleeping

After a few days of the puppy exploring the crate on his own, bring it into your bedroom before retiring for the evening. Make sure he doesn’t eat or drink anything for about 2 hours prior to bedtime.

Just before bed, when the house is calm, exercise the puppy and make sure he’s gone to the bathroom. Then place him in the crate with a quiet chew toy and close the door. Being in the same room as you may discourage whining or pawing. If the whining does not stop, you’ll be close by to quiet him.

Don’t react immediately to his whining, unless you believe he needs to go outside. Often ignoring puppies is the best way to train them out of a problem behavior. Do not try to put the puppy in his crate to sleep before you are ready to go to bed.

4. Bathroom breaks

Anticipate taking him out to eliminate at some point during the night (3 hours for a 2-month old, 5 hours for a 4-month old, etc.). After a couple of evenings, you may know what time he’ll wake up to go to the bathroom. Set an alarm to wake yourself 15 to 30-minutes prior to that so you can get him out of the crate before he begins to cry or paw.

This discourages crying simply to be rewarded with getting out of the crate. After a few evenings in your bedroom, try leaving your puppy in the crate in its normal location overnight. Remember to wake yourself up to take him out during the night.

The Benefits

In addition to house training, other behaviors can be handled with crate training. Your puppy will begin to view the crate as a “safe haven”. When the activity level in the home is elevated or you are entertaining, your puppy can retire to his crate and still observe the activity without having to be in the midst of it.

Some dogs fear vacuum cleaner noise. A crate is a wonderful place for him to feel safe from the big, bad machine. It also gives you a place to put him if you can’t keep a close eye on him before he’s house trained or allowed to roam freely.

Some dogs react poorly when they are separated from their human family. Behaviors like barking, whining, digging or other destructive behaviors may occur while you are away from them. It’s a stressful condition that takes a toll not only on your neighbors or furniture, but your dog as well. By crating him for short periods of time while you are out of his sight in another room, you can desensitize him to your absence.

Barking, whining, and pawing are several of the behaviors you can train out of him with a crate. If he does any of these things while in the crate, he’ll learn that he only gets released when he stops. Similarly, if your puppy has begun to think he’s the boss of the house, the act of placing him in his crate and deciding when he can come out will help re-establish you as the leader.

Safety Tips For Driving With Your Dog

driving, dog, car

Running errands or going on road trips with your furry friend is an increasingly common practice these days. Unfortunately, most drivers don’t consider the dangers posed by having an unrestrained dog in the car. Keep reading to learn of common dangers associated with driving in the company of an unrestrained dog, and some need to know safety tips.

A Road Paved with Good Intentions

“My dog is calm and doesn’t move around.”

“My dog is too small to cause a problem.”

“I can protect my dog better if he’s in my lap.”

Above are just some of the excuses used to justify allowing dogs unlimited access in cars. While these sentiments surely come from a place of love, they don’t negate the potential for distraction and harm.

Potential Driving Dangers

It is dangerous to have any dog, even a small one, lying in your lap while you drive. They could unexpectedly jump up and knock the steering wheel, block your vision or throw your car out of gear. Fido could crawl onto the floor and inhibit your ability to properly operate the pedals.

A dog riding with his head out an open car window makes most people smile. However, it’s actually an invitation for problems. Watching the faces Fido makes takes your attention off the road. Your dog may try to jump out to chase something, forcing you to focus on keeping him in the car.

Even a dog that normally rides well in the back seat may be tempted to jump into the front. Whether he lands on your lap or goes for the passenger seat, you’ll be focused on calming him down verses driving.

An unrestrained dog is also vulnerable to injury when you break, redirecting your attention from a potentially dangerous road situation to protecting your dog from harm.

Tips to Minimize the Risks

Here are some key tips for a safe car ride with your pet.

  • To help avoid spastic behavior from your canine while driving, let Fido get used to smaller car rides and slowly increase the distance as he gets more comfortable.
  • Never allow your pet to sit on your lap or in the front of the car while driving.
  • Avoid unnecessary injury by keeping your pet away from the bed of your pickup truck. If a car accident occurs, your dog will have no protection.
  • To avoid miscellaneous objects injuring your pet, do not allow Fido to stick his head out the window.
  • The final step to eliminating the distractions of driving with your dog is quite simple (no, you don’t have to leave him at home): restrain him in either a specialized harness or crate. Getting the right apparatus is key to keeping your dog comfortable, but a proper restraint not only keeps your focus on the road; it also keeps your dog safe.

Adding the above steps to your driving regime when traveling with Fido will help keep you and your canine family member safe. You can also help protect your dog from harmful free radicals by giving him NuVet Labs supplements. Protect your dog with NuVet Plus K-9 and by restraining him in the car.